Cosmic Tuesdays
capturedphotos:

Dry Leaves
Granite Bay, California
Photographed by: http://capturedphotos.tumblr.com/  

capturedphotos:

Dry Leaves

Granite Bay, California

Photographed by: http://capturedphotos.tumblr.com/  

theparisreview:

“The fiction I’m most interested in has lines of reference to the real world. None of my stories really happened, of course. But there’s always something, some element, something said to me or that I witnessed, that may be the starting place. Here’s an example: ‘That’s the last Christmas you’ll ever ruin for us!’ I was drunk when I heard that, but I remembered it. And later, much later, when I was sober, using only that one line and other things I imagined, imagined so accurately that they could have happened, I made a story—‘A Serious Talk.’ But the fiction I’m most interested in, whether it’s Tolstoy’s fiction, Chekhov, Barry Hannah, Richard Ford, Hemingway, Isaac Babel, Ann Beattie, or Anne Tyler, strikes me as autobiographical to some extent. At the very least it’s referential. Stories long or short don’t just come out of thin air. I’m reminded of a conversation involving John Cheever. We were sitting around a table in Iowa City with some people and he happened to remark that after a family fracas at his home one night, he got up the next morning and went into the bathroom to find something his daughter had written in lipstick on the bathroom mirror: ‘D-e-r-e daddy, don’t leave us.’ Someone at the table spoke up and said, ‘I recognize that from one of your stories.’ Cheever said, ‘Probably so. Everything I write is autobiographical.’ Now of course that’s not literally true. But everything we write is, in some way, autobiographical. I’m not in the least bothered by ‘autobiographical’ fiction. To the contrary. On the Road. Céline. Roth. Lawrence Durrell in The Alexandria Quartet. So much of Hemingway in the Nick Adams stories. Updike, too, you bet. Jim McConkey. Clark Blaise is a contemporary writer whose fiction is out-and-out autobiography. Of course, you have to know what you’re doing when you turn your life’s stories into fiction. You have to be immensely daring, very skilled and imaginative and willing to tell everything on yourself. You’re told time and again when you’re young to write about what you know, and what do you know better than your own secrets? But unless you’re a special kind of writer, and a very talented one, it’s dangerous to try and write volume after volume on The Story of My Life. A great danger, or at least a great temptation, for many writers is to become too autobiographical in their approach to their fiction. A little autobiography and a lot of imagination are best.”
—Raymond Carver, The Art of Fiction No. 76

theparisreview:

“The fiction I’m most interested in has lines of reference to the real world. None of my stories really happened, of course. But there’s always something, some element, something said to me or that I witnessed, that may be the starting place. Here’s an example: ‘That’s the last Christmas you’ll ever ruin for us!’ I was drunk when I heard that, but I remembered it. And later, much later, when I was sober, using only that one line and other things I imagined, imagined so accurately that they could have happened, I made a story—‘A Serious Talk.’ But the fiction I’m most interested in, whether it’s Tolstoy’s fiction, Chekhov, Barry Hannah, Richard Ford, Hemingway, Isaac Babel, Ann Beattie, or Anne Tyler, strikes me as autobiographical to some extent. At the very least it’s referential. Stories long or short don’t just come out of thin air. I’m reminded of a conversation involving John Cheever. We were sitting around a table in Iowa City with some people and he happened to remark that after a family fracas at his home one night, he got up the next morning and went into the bathroom to find something his daughter had written in lipstick on the bathroom mirror: ‘D-e-r-e daddy, don’t leave us.’ Someone at the table spoke up and said, ‘I recognize that from one of your stories.’ Cheever said, ‘Probably so. Everything I write is autobiographical.’ Now of course that’s not literally true. But everything we write is, in some way, autobiographical. I’m not in the least bothered by ‘autobiographical’ fiction. To the contrary. On the Road. Céline. Roth. Lawrence Durrell in The Alexandria Quartet. So much of Hemingway in the Nick Adams stories. Updike, too, you bet. Jim McConkey. Clark Blaise is a contemporary writer whose fiction is out-and-out autobiography. Of course, you have to know what you’re doing when you turn your life’s stories into fiction. You have to be immensely daring, very skilled and imaginative and willing to tell everything on yourself. You’re told time and again when you’re young to write about what you know, and what do you know better than your own secrets? But unless you’re a special kind of writer, and a very talented one, it’s dangerous to try and write volume after volume on The Story of My Life. A great danger, or at least a great temptation, for many writers is to become too autobiographical in their approach to their fiction. A little autobiography and a lot of imagination are best.”

Raymond Carver, The Art of Fiction No. 76

prostheticknowledge:

Robotic Spider Dress 

Techno Couture from Anouk Wipprecht, a dress with insect-like robotic limbs which react to the proximity of others - video demonstration embedded below:

Youtube link

goldenheartedrose:

neurowonderful:

Just a little thing that I made, because neuroatypical brains are beautiful and great, and neurodiversity is awesome!

This is so gorgeous!!I love it.

goldenheartedrose:

neurowonderful:

Just a little thing that I made, because neuroatypical brains are beautiful and great, and neurodiversity is awesome!

This is so gorgeous!!

I love it.

Was that the first time you’ve kissed someone since 1944?

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

What if he says no because he’s done a lot of kissing since then? But not with a lot of girls, just with Peggy?

Every time he goes to see her, she’s forgotten him, and she’s so happy to see him again, and even now she’s still beautiful. They’re the same age, God knows. If not for the Red Skull, he might have been kissing her for the last seventy years. 

Sometimes he has to kiss her hello twice a visit. It’s not an imposition.

domadrid:

Tuesday inspiration from Bettina Krieg’s studio.

domadrid:

Tuesday inspiration from Bettina Krieg’s studio.

archiemcphee:

Do you ever wonder what your toys get up to when you aren’t around? Malaysian photographer Zahir Batin stages fantastic scenes using his Star Wars figurines that demonstrate some awesome possibilities, which range from cute and playful to action-packed or downright somber. A group of Stormtroopers hang out with some sweet chicks while another pair takes the day off to go fishing. Epic battles take place and those who survive bury and mourn their fallen comrades.

What’s more, over on Facebook Batin freely shares the techniques he uses to achieve these shots and encourages other people to give it a try. For many of the photos he uses strings, wires and twigs to position the action figures and then simply removes those supports from the final images using Photoshop.

Head over to DeviantART, 500px or Facebook to check out many more of Zahir Batin’s wonderful photos.

[via Design Taxi]

creaturesfromdreams:

Moon and Crow by James Zapata

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euclase2:

Locations of the Planes by M0AI